Disabling “secured” IPv6 addresses is macOS 10.12 Sierra

On older macOS versions, every network interface would have one IPv6 address autogenerated from its MAC address, easily identified by the characteristic “ff:fe” bytes in the middle of the host part:
$ ifconfig en0
[...]
ether 10:dd:b1:9f:6b:ba
inet6 fe80::12dd:b1ff:fe9f:6bba%en0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x4
inet6 2001:7c0:2012:4a:12dd:b1ff:fe9f:6bba prefixlen 64 autoconf
[...]

Since macOS 10.12 however, these were replaced with randomly-generated “secured” addresses:
$ ifconfig en0
[...]
ether 10:dd:b1:9b:d0:67
inet6 fe80::46:3b36:146:9857%en0 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x4
inet6 2001:7c0:2012:4a:4e6:f1d1:dd90:c6b4 prefixlen 64 autoconf secured
[...]

Very little is known about these, besides a single mailing list post that discovered them. If you are running a server, you’ll want your IPv6 address to be deterministic so you can register it in DNS. Therefore, we need to revert to pre-10.12 behavior:

$ echo net.inet6.send.opmode=0 >> /etc/sysctl.conf
$ reboot

If you look at the source code of the XNU kernel (Search for the IN6_IFF_SECURED flag) and the IPConfiguration service in macOS 10.11 (the 10.12 source code hasn’t been released yet), you can see that the new behavior was already there, just not enabled by default like it is now. Also, we now know that the change wasn’t made to reflect RFC 7217 (Semantically Opaque Interface Identifiers) behavior, but rather implements RFC 3972 (Cryptographically Generated Addresses).